CfP: The Many Faces of Late Socialism: The Individual in the “Eastern Bloc,” 1953-1988

CFP: The Many Faces of Late Socialism: The Individual in the “Eastern Bloc,” 1953-1988 (May 26-28, 2016, University of Cologne, Germany) – Research Workshop

How did individuals who grew up under state socialism experience and, in turn, influence what we now call ‘Late Socialism’? Individuals figure prominently in narratives about state socialism’s repressive character and passive or open resistance to “the system.” At the time, persecuted dissidents such as Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Adam Michnik, and Václav Havel represented the ideal of the unfaltering, independent mind. Today people like Jan Palach and the almost 10 million individuals who had joined Solidarność by 1981 remain firmly integrated into the narrative of Central Eastern Europe’s return to the fold of the “free world.” However, even though people participated in events that challenged socialist state power, the different versions of state socialism in Eastern Europe remained quiet stable between 1953 and 1988. And despite the whirlwind developments of perestroika, the eventual disintegration of state socialism took most people by surprise.

The purpose of this workshop is to gain a better understanding of both the stabilizing and the disruptive forces at work during Late Socialism by reexamining individuals’ views, milieus, everyday practices, and self-understandings. Continue reading

CFP: Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

This two-day interdisciplinary conference will explore the shifting political, socio-economic, cultural and medical influences that have formed and perpetuated cultures of harm from the eighteenth century to the present day. We are particularly interested in the production of harmful practices – physical, sexual and psychological violence directed by one person or group against another – in therapeutic and caring environments, worldwide. These might include hospitals and infirmaries, psychiatric facilities, religious institutions, care homes, children’s homes and educational establishments, as well as infirmaries and medical spaces in prisons and correctional institutions, military barracks, camps and workhouses.

Please submit an abstract of up to 300 words together with a brief outline of your academic affiliation to trauma@mail.bbk.ac.uk by 20 September 2015.

Full details can be found at www.bbk.ac.uk/trauma/events

CFP: The Black Sea in the Socialist World

Birkbeck College, University of London

February 6-7, 2015

Sponsored by the British Association for Slavonic and East European Studies

 

In May 1962, shortly before the Cuban Missile Crisis, Soviet premiere Nikita Khrushchev toured Bulgaria. Under banners declaring “Forward, to Communism!” at a mass meeting in Varna, a Bulgarian health resort, Khrushchev lauded the Bulgarian people for the way in which they had developed the Black Sea coastline. Model health resorts like Varna, which drew visitors from all over the world, were the pride of the Bulgarian people, he claimed. These resorts demonstrated the commitment of the socialist states to the health and welfare of the people. He contrasted the health resorts on the socialist side of the Black Sea to the NATO missile build-up across the sea in Turkey. The health resorts of the Black Sea demonstrated the peace-loving nature of the socialist states to the world. “The Black Sea should be a sea of peace and the friendship of the peoples,” he argued.

While interest in the place of the Black Sea in the history of tourism, public health and architecture has grown rapidly in recent years, leading to ground-breaking studies, these works have treated each topic and national context in isolation. Works on Cold War diplomacy, too, have not taken into full consideration the position of the Black Sea as a site of cultural and political diplomacy in the socialist world. This workshop seeks to bring together historians studying the Black Sea or whose work involves the Black Sea from a variety of perspectives and both historians of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc. The objective of the workshop is to develop the idea of the Black Sea littoral as an international meeting place of the socialist world.

As Khrushchev’s words suggested, the idea of the socialist Black Sea was closely linked to ideas of health and welfare during times of peace. The Black Sea littoral became a favoured health retreat of the political elite and soon became a setting for high politics and diplomatic negotiations. With the Yalta conference (February 4-11, 1945), the place of the Black Sea as a site of East-West diplomacy was formalized. But the Black Sea also became a place of less formal international exchange. From international children’s camps to delegation visits, at the Black Sea people from the socialist world introduced visitors from all over the world to the socialist way of life, in a Cold War contest fought over standards of living.

Participants are sought to present papers which may but will not necessarily fall into the following themes: The divided sea in the Cold War; the political context of Soviet-Turkish, East-West and socialist relations; ideas of Europe; international law; mobility, migration and tourism; commodities; socialist design and urban planning; environmental health; international congresses and festivals, and environmental history. Papers relating to all countries of the Eastern Bloc and the USSR, and which emphasize transnational and international components, are welcome.

For more details, please see: The Reluctant Internationalists Blog

Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena Fellowships 2015

The Imre Kertész Kolleg invites applications for Fellowships for 2015 for a period up to twelve months.

Applications are invited from noted and established scholars in the history of Eastern Europe or neighboring disciplines with a clear preference for projects focusing on East Central and South Eastern Europe. Fellows are expected to conduct a larger scholarly project corresponding to the research profile of the Kolleg. Fellows are expected to work at the Imre Kertész Kolleg and to reside in Jena. Stipends range from € 3.000 to € 5.300 per month according to the academic position at the home institution. The Kolleg will provide fully equipped work space, support by student research assistants, and will help finding appropriate accommodation in Jena.

Further information on the Kolleg can be found here.

Applications must include:

  • curriculum vitae
  • list of publications
  • project proposal in English (not exceeding 5 pages)
  • a statement on the relevance of the research project to the Kolleg’s research profile (not exceeding 2 pages)

Application must be received no later than 28th February, 2014 and should be sent electronically to the directors of the Kolleg:

Prof. Dr. Włodzimierz Borodziej, Prof. Dr. Joachim v. Puttkamer, Imre Kertész Kolleg, Jena Am Planetarium 7 07743 Jena Germany

Mail: imre-kertesz-kolleg@uni-jena.de

It is advised to study the Notes for Applicants

Informal inquiries may be addressed to the Managing Director of the Kolleg, Dr Raphael Utz, on raphael.utz@uni-jena.de or +49-3641-944073

Annual Meeting of the AAHM in Chicago, 2014

The American Association for the History of Medicine invites submissions in any area of medical/health care history for its 87th annual meeting, to be held in Chicago, Illinois, USA, 8 – 11 May 2014. The Association welcomes submissions on the history of health and healing; history of medical ideas, practices, and institutions; and histories of illness, disease, and public health. Submissions pertaining to all eras and regions of the world are welcome. Papers and panels that expand the horizons of medical history and engage related fields are particularly encouraged. In addition to single-paper proposals, the Program Committee, led by co-chairs Jeremy Greene and Shigehisa Kuriyama will also accept abstracts for luncheon workshops and entertain proposals for creatively-structured panels.

The deadline for submission is September 27, 2013. Please click here for details.

BASEES Conference 2014 Call for Papers

Proposals are invited for panels, roundtables and papers for the 2014 Annual Conference of the British Association of Slavonic and East European Studies (BASEES).
Panels, roundtables and papers are welcome in the areas of Politics; History; Sociology and Geography; Film and Media, Languages and Linguistics; Literatures and Cultures; Economics. The conference especially welcomes participation by postgraduate research students and by young scholars.
To propose a panel or a paper you will need to fill in a proposal form. There are separate forms for panels/roundtables and papers. The forms can be downloaded from the conference website www.basees2014.org. You should download the appropriate form and fill it in electronically, and send it electronically to the appropriate subject stream email AND to the conference email address.
Postgraduate members of BASEES who present papers are eligible to apply for financial support towards their conference costs.
The deadline for panel/roundtable proposals is 1 October 2013, and 16 September 2013 for individual paper proposals. The proposal forms are downloadable from the website.
Proposals should be submitted to the appropriate subject group:
The congress also welcomes proposals for postgraduate posters. The poster will be displayed throughout the conference. Please fill in the proposal form (available from the website) and email it as an attachment to the conference email address info@basees2014.org AND the Dr Matthias Neumann m.neumann@uea.ac.uk by 1 December 2013.

Society for the Social History of Medicine 2014 Conference

Disease, Health and the State

The Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present, Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford

Call for Papers
Proposals that consider all topics relevant to the history of medicine broadly conceived are invited, but the 2014 committee encourages proposals for papers, sessions, and round-tables that examine, challenge, and refine the history of disease, health and the state. Suggested themes include local and global understandings of health, medicine, and governance; the consolidation, breakdown, or absence of state power in the midst of health and medical crises; and the experience of health and medical bureaucracies in the past.

Paper submissions should include a 250-word abstract and a short CV. Panel submissions should include three papers (each with a 250-word abstract and short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract. Round-table submissions should include the names of four participants (each with a short CV), a chair, and a 500-word abstract.

Call closes: 1 January 2014

Further details: www.sshm2014.org